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"a death in which we were so soon to join"

First, more pumpkin art, with a twist of science fiction: check out the Cylon Jack-O-Lantern and the Robotic Dalek Pumpkin. (Thanks to altariel for the links!)


I recently read for the first time a short and chilling novel, The Poison Belt (1913) by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Although it revisits some of the characters from Doyle's The Lost World, it is a self-contained story that requires no previous knowledge from the reader. Its powerful and thought-provoking portrayal of what it might be like to witness the end of the world as we know it makes the novel well worth a read--not to mention quite appropriate for Halloween! This passage captures the poignant terror of the work:

I remember that the monstrous and grotesque idea crossed my mind--the illusion may have been heightened by the heavy stuffiness of the air which we were breathing--that we were in four front seats of the stalls at the last act of the drama of the world.

In the immediate foreground, beneath our very eyes, was the small yard with the half-cleaned motor-car standing in it. Austin, the chauffeur, had received his final notice at last, for he was sprawling beside the wheel, with a great black bruise upon his forehead where it had struck the step or mud-guard in falling. He still held in his hand the nozzle of the hose with which he had been washing down his machine. A couple of small plane trees stood in the corner of the yard, and underneath them lay several pathetic little balls of fluffy feathers, with tiny feet uplifted. The sweep of death's scythe had included everything, great and small, within its swath.


Over the wall of the yard we looked down upon the winding road, which led to the station. A group of the reapers whom we had seen running from the fields were lying all pell-mell, their bodies crossing each other, at the bottom of it. Farther up, the nurse-girl lay with her head and shoulders propped against the slope of the grassy bank. She had taken the baby from the perambulator, and it was a motionless bundle of wraps in her arms. Close behind her a tiny patch upon the roadside showed where the little boy was stretched. Still nearer to us was the dead cab-horse, kneeling between the shafts. The old driver was hanging over the splash-board like some grotesque scarecrow, his arms dangling absurdly in front of him. Through the window we could dimly discern that a young man was seated inside. The door was swinging open and his hand was grasping the handle, as if he had attempted to leap forth at the last instant. In the middle distance lay the golf links, dotted as they had been in the morning with the dark figures of the golfers, lying motionless upon the grass of the course or among the heather which skirted it. On one particular green there were eight bodies stretched where a foursome with its caddies had held to their game to the last. No bird flew in the blue vault of heaven, no man or beast moved upon the vast countryside which lay before us. The evening sun shone its peaceful radiance across it, but there brooded over it all the stillness and the silence of universal death--a death in which we were so soon to join. At the present instant that one frail sheet of glass, by holding in the extra oxygen which counteracted the poisoned ether, shut us off from the fate of all our kind. For a few short hours the knowledge and foresight of one man could preserve our little oasis of life in the vast desert of death and save us from participation in the common catastrophe. Then the gas would run low, we too should lie gasping upon that cherry-coloured boudoir carpet, and the fate of the human race and of all earthly life would be complete. For a long time, in a mood which was too solemn for speech, we looked out at the tragic world.


Read the entire novel here or here.

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Comments

( 12 comments — Leave a comment )
sittingduck1313
Oct. 26th, 2006 01:02 pm (UTC)
Those Jack-o-lanterns are totally kewl. One problem though. You got the links mixed up. The one that says Cylon leads to the Dalek and vice versa.
eldritchhobbit
Oct. 26th, 2006 01:08 pm (UTC)
Yikes! I'm so glad you told me - thanks! I've fixed the links. They are amazing, aren't they?
mamomo
Oct. 26th, 2006 02:05 pm (UTC)
Yay for creative pumpkins!

And double yay for Doyle! I haven't read much of his stuff outside the Holmes canon, so I'm really eager to check this story out.
eldritchhobbit
Oct. 27th, 2006 12:12 pm (UTC)
Yays all around! :)

The Poison Belt is a wonderfully haunting story - I hope you enjoy it as much as I did!
wellinghall
Oct. 26th, 2006 02:32 pm (UTC)
Good story, isn't it.
eldritchhobbit
Oct. 27th, 2006 12:13 pm (UTC)
Fabulous! Extremely poignant. The images stuck with me long after reading.
wellinghall
Oct. 26th, 2006 02:32 pm (UTC)
Can I spread the news on the pumpkins?
eldritchhobbit
Oct. 27th, 2006 12:13 pm (UTC)
Please do! :)
agentxpndble
Oct. 26th, 2006 02:54 pm (UTC)
OMG those pumkins are *AWESOME*!

I remember that the monstrous and grotesque idea crossed my mind--the illusion may have been heightened by the heavy stuffiness of the air which we were breathing--that we were in four front seats of the stalls at the last act of the drama of the world.

Augh! How completely gorgeous!
eldritchhobbit
Oct. 27th, 2006 12:13 pm (UTC)
Aren't the pumpkins great?

That passage is gorgeous. The rest of the story is equally as compelling, too. Great stuff.
witchcat07
Oct. 26th, 2006 08:01 pm (UTC)
Yes, the pumkins are totally kewl, even though the Dalek one is not very recognizable as a pumpkin.
eldritchhobbit
Oct. 27th, 2006 12:15 pm (UTC)
LOL!
( 12 comments — Leave a comment )

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