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I am excited that the Library of America series has recognized the enduring legacy of H.P. Lovecraft and now published H.P. Lovecraft: Tales. This volume is bringing new attention and appreciation to Lovecraft and the genre(s) of which he was a pioneer, as recent articles from The Weekly Standard and Salon.com attest.

Hats off in particular to columnist Michael Dirda, who groks:

As he was dying in 1937 at age forty-six, he may well have felt he had lived in vain. His stories--sixty or seventy works of various lengths and completeness--resided in scattered notebooks and throwaway pulp magazines, uncollected and unlikely to be remembered. But it now seems beyond dispute that H.P. Lovecraft is the most important American writer of weird fiction in the twentieth century--and one of the century's most influential writers of any kind of fiction.... What matters is that he possesses the storyteller's greatest gift, the one Nabokov called shamanstvo: the "enchanter quality."

Indeed.


And while I'm giving props, as it were, Agent Xpndble has reworked and updated her John Castle Gallery to create John Castle: An Unofficial Fan Site. Go and enjoy.


Without further ado, a quote for the day:

"...Now it is told in the moldy Pnakotic Manuscripts that Sansu found naught but wordless ice and rock when he did climb Hatheg-Kla in the youth of the world. Yet when the men of Ulthar and Nir and Hatheg crushed their fears and scaled that haunted steep by day in search of Barzai the Wise, they found graven in the naked stone of the summit a curious and cyclopean symbol fifty cubits wide, as if the rock had been riven by some titanic chisel. And the symbol was like to one that learned men have discerned in those frightful parts of the Pnakotic Manuscripts which were too ancient to be read. This they found.

"Barzai the Wise they never found, nor could the holy priest Atal ever be persuaded to pray for his soul's repose. Moreover, to this day the people of Ulthar and Nir and Hatheg fear eclipses, and pray by night when pale vapors hide the mountain-top and the moon. And above the mists on Hatheg-Kla, earth's gods sometimes dance reminiscently; for they know they are safe, and love to come from unknown Kadath in ships of clouds and play in the olden way, as they did when earth was new and men not given to the climbing of inaccessible places."

from "The Other Gods," H.P. Lovecraft