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Halloween Countdown, Day 13

I'd like to start off my post today with a fan video tribute to Universal's classic horror films, including Dracula (1931), Frankenstein (1931), The Mummy (1932), The Invisible Man (1933), Bride of Frankenstein (1935), The Wolf Man (1941), Phantom of the Opera (1943), and Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954). Enjoy JFakeWeston's spooky "Horror Is Universal"!



LINKS OF THE DAY: Today's links all share a common subject.

1. Here's some fascinating recent news from The Guardian: "Stoker's Blood Relative to Bring Dracula Back from the Undead." (Thanks to agentxpndble!)

2. The articles from past issues of The Journal of Dracula Studies are archived here for easy access. No subscription is necessary. Read essays about Dracula in everything from fiction and history to film and comics.

3. The Transylvania Society of Dracula (Canadian Chapter) is a non-profit, historical-cultural organization is open to those in Canada and the USA. The group promotes contacts between scholars and interested readers from Romania and the West.


LITERATURE OF THE DAY: Appropriately enough for this thematic post, today's reading is the eerie science fiction story "The Monster Maker" by W.C. Morrow (1854-1923).

Excerpt from "The Monster Maker" by W.C. Morrow:
"Sit down" commanded the stern voice of the surgeon.

It was the voice of father to child, of master to slave. The fury left the visitor, who, weak and overcome, fell upon a chair.

Meanwhile, a peculiar light had appeared in the old surgeon's face, the dawn of a strange idea; a gloomy ray, strayed from the fires of the bottomless pit; the baleful light that illumines the way of the enthusiast. The old man remained a moment in profound abstraction, gleams of eager intelligence bursting momentarily through the cloud of somber meditation that covered his face. Then broke the broad light of a deep, impenetrable determination. There was something sinister in it, suggesting the sacrifice of something held sacred. After a struggle, mind had vanquished conscience.

Read the complete story.

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Comments

( 8 comments — Leave a comment )
cyloran
Oct. 13th, 2008 12:34 pm (UTC)
I do so love the vintage Universal horror pix. Karloff, Lugosi, Chaney. And let's not forget the often unsung Dwight Frye!
eldritchhobbit
Oct. 14th, 2008 03:52 pm (UTC)
Excellent point - we must remember Dwight Frye, too!

I love your icon. :)
(Deleted comment)
eldritchhobbit
Oct. 14th, 2008 03:53 pm (UTC)
I'm so glad you liked the video! I thought it was lots of fun. I hope you enjoy the links.
fungus_files
Oct. 14th, 2008 04:13 am (UTC)
Still totally ♥-ing you! I luvs that icon and this post (and, a while back, particularly enjoyed the spooky tour around L.'s campus!).

From Morrow's story:
the baleful light that illumines the way of the enthusiast

I think we ALL know that light...see, there it goes...

*scampers after it*
eldritchhobbit
Oct. 14th, 2008 03:54 pm (UTC)
I'm so happy that you're enjoying the posts! The campus tour was particularly fun to put together. I'm so glad you liked it.

I think we ALL know that light...see, there it goes...

*scampers after it*


Right behind you! :)
gilda_elise
Oct. 14th, 2008 10:52 am (UTC)
I'd like to start off my post today with a fan video tribute to Universal's classic horror films, including Dracula (1931), Frankenstein (1931), The Mummy (1932), The Invisible Man (1933), Bride of Frankenstein (1935), The Wolf Man (1941), Phantom of the Opera (1943), and Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954). Enjoy JFakeWeston's spooky "Horror Is Universal"!

I love this! I think it'll make a great Halloween "card."

2. The articles from past issues of The Journal of Dracula Studies are archived here for easy access. No subscription is necessary. Read essays about Dracula in everything from fiction and history to film and comics.

Thanks for the link! It'll take me awhile to get through it all, but what a great resource!

LITERATURE OF THE DAY: Appropriately enough for this thematic post, today's reading is the eerie science fiction story "The Monster Maker" by W.C. Morrow (1854-1923).

Well, that was an odd little story. I'm not sure if I wish he'd described the "monster" more clearly or not. Of course, who's to know who the monster was!


eldritchhobbit
Oct. 14th, 2008 03:56 pm (UTC)
I'm so glad you like the video! I thought it was fantastic. I hope you enjoy the journal articles.

Of course, who's to know who the monster was!

Good point! *shudders*
( 8 comments — Leave a comment )