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Halloween Countdown, Day 18

On this day in 1785 was born Thomas Love Peacock (18 October, 1785 – 23 January, 1866), who was both a close friend of Percy Bysshe Shelley and a popular English novelist, satirist, and poet in his own right.

Folio edition of Peacock's Nightmare Abbey, one of my favourite novels


Let's celebrate the occasion with an excerpt from Peacock's darkly funny 1818 novel, the Halloween-appropriate Nightmare Abbey.

There's a dark lantern of the spirit,
Which none see by but those who bear it,
That makes them in the dark see visions
And hag themselves with apparitions,
Find racks for their own minds, and vaunt
Of their own misery and want.
-- Butler

... Nightmare Abbey, a venerable family-mansion, in a highly picturesque state of semi-dilapidation, pleasantly situated on a strip of dry land between the sea and the fens, at the verge of the county of Lincoln, had the honour to be the seat of Christopher Glowry, Esquire. This gentleman was naturally of an atrabilarious temperament, and much troubled with those phantoms of indigestion which are commonly called blue devils. He had been deceived in an early friendship: he had been crossed in love; and had offered his hand, from pique, to a lady, who accepted it from interest, and who, in so doing, violently tore asunder the bonds of a tried and youthful attachment. Her vanity was gratified by being the mistress of a very extensive, if not very lively, establishment; but all the springs of her sympathies were frozen. Riches she possessed, but that which enriches them, the participation of affection, was wanting. All that they could purchase for her became indifferent to her, because that which they could not purchase, and which was more valuable than themselves, she had, for their sake, thrown away. She discovered, when it was too late, that she had mistaken the means for the end—that riches, rightly used, are instruments of happiness, but are not in themselves happiness. In this wilful blight of her affections, she found them valueless as means: they had been the end to which she had immolated all her affections, and were now the only end that remained to her. She did not confess this to herself as a principle of action, but it operated through the medium of unconscious self-deception, and terminated in inveterate avarice. She laid on external things the blame of her mind's internal disorder, and thus became by degrees an accomplished scold. She often went her daily rounds through a series of deserted apartments, every creature in the house vanishing at the creak of her shoe, much more at the sound of her voice, to which the nature of things affords no simile; for, as far as the voice of woman, when attuned by gentleness and love, transcends all other sounds in harmony, so far does it surpass all others in discord, when stretched into unnatural shrillness by anger and impatience.

Mr Glowry used to say that his house was no better than a spacious kennel, for every one in it led the life of a dog. Disappointed both in love and in friendship, and looking upon human learning as vanity, he had come to a conclusion that there was but one good thing in the world, videlicet, a good dinner; and this his parsimonious lady seldom suffered him to enjoy: but, one morning, like Sir Leoline in Christabel, 'he woke and found his lady dead,' and remained a very consolate widower, with one small child.

This only son and heir Mr Glowry had christened Scythrop, from the name of a maternal ancestor, who had hanged himself one rainy day in a fit of toedium vitae, and had been eulogised by a coroner's jury in the comprehensive phrase of felo de se; on which account, Mr Glowry held his memory in high honour, and made a punchbowl of his skull.


* Read the complete novel here.
* Download the unabridged audiobook of the novel from Librivox here.

Abbey Night

Comments

( 6 comments — Leave a comment )
(Anonymous)
Oct. 18th, 2013 11:25 am (UTC)
"and remained a very consolate widower....."

funniest line ever......

eldritchhobbit
Oct. 18th, 2013 12:46 pm (UTC)
That cracked me up!
whswhs
Oct. 18th, 2013 01:47 pm (UTC)
My favorite of Peacock's verses is "The War Song of Dinas Vawr," which gives you ancient Celts who haven't been all prettied up. I always hear it in my mind with drums and whistles in the background. But I suppose it's not quite Hallowe'enish or even Beltanean.
eldritchhobbit
Oct. 18th, 2013 09:58 pm (UTC)
I'm sorry to say I haven't read that verse. It's now on my list, thanks to you! It sounds wonderful.
whswhs
Oct. 19th, 2013 02:22 am (UTC)
The mountain sheep are sweeter,
But the valley sheep are fatter.
We therefore deemed it meeter
To carry off the latter. . . .
eldritchhobbit
Oct. 20th, 2013 11:52 am (UTC)
LOL! I love it.
( 6 comments — Leave a comment )